What is the attitude of Old Man Warner in the lottery?

First, Old Man Warner actually believes that the Lottery is good for the town. Twice he calls young people a “pack of fools,” for even considering doing away with the Lottery. Tied to this point, he is a very traditional man. To change tradition is sacrilegious.

How would you describe Old Man Warner in the lottery?

Old Man Warner, the oldest man in town, has participated in seventy-seven lotteries and is a staunch advocate for keeping things exactly the way they are. He dismisses the towns and young people who have stopped having lotteries as “crazy fools,” and he is threatened by the idea of change.

What does Mr Warner represent in the lottery?

He is reacting to offhand remarks people are making as the lottery comes to a close. The implication is that people used to be more respectful than they are now. In the story, Old Man Warner represents the continuity of the lottery system through the generations.

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What is the attitude of the author in the lottery?

In the short story, Jackson depicts the citizens of the town as being insensitive, ignorant, and violent as they passively accept the tradition of stoning a random innocent citizen each year. Jackson condemns blindly following traditions and ridicules how the villagers revere the lottery.

What is Jackson’s attitude toward the lottery?

I believe that the author’s own attitude toward the lottery and the stoning is that it is unfair and purposeless violence. Throughout the story, the writer purposely described the scene as a warm summer morning where flowers were blossoming and the grass was green.

What does he say will happen without a lottery?

In Old Man Warner’s eyes, doing away with the lottery would be akin to going back to primitive times. He believes that society would fail without the lottery. His belief, likely shared by many in their community, indicates how people could be willing to accept such a violent tradition.

What do you make of Old Man Warner’s saying?

Old Man Warner says, “Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon.” This is said during the conversation that Mr. Adams has with him.

What does the black dot symbolize in the lottery?

In the story, “The Lottery,” the black box symbolizes the judgment of the members of the town. The list of names represent those who will be judged—one of whom will die. The black spot is symbolic of the person from the town who is chosen to die.

What was old man Warners role?

In “The Lottery,” Old Man Warner is the tradition keeper of the town. He has attended seventy-five Lotteries. He is the oldest man in the village and has taken it upon himself to be the guardian of the town’s traditions.

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Which statement is a theme of the lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What is the mood of lottery?

In ‘The Lottery,’ the mood begins as light and cheerful, but shifts to tense and ominous.

Why is the ending of the lottery so shocking?

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

How does Jackson foreshadow the ending?

Jackson starts to foreshadow the climax by creating some anticipation with the children and when the black box was pulled out. … She also foreshadows it when Mrs. Hutchinson says that it is not fair, when the Hutchinson family was pulled the first time.

What is the symbolism of the black box and stones in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Shirley Jackson uses the black box and stones to symbolize death in order to support a key theme.

Is Tessie an innocent victim?

Her friends and family participate in the killing with as much enthusiasm as everyone else. Tessie essentially becomes invisible to them in the fervor of persecution. Although she has done nothing “wrong,” her innocence doesn’t matter.