Your question: What does the author think about the lottery?

In the short story, Jackson depicts the citizens of the town as being insensitive, ignorant, and violent as they passively accept the tradition of stoning a random innocent citizen each year. Jackson condemns blindly following traditions and ridicules how the villagers revere the lottery.

What is the author’s attitude toward The Lottery and the stoning?

I believe that the author’s own attitude toward the lottery and the stoning is that it is unfair and purposeless violence. Throughout the story, the writer purposely described the scene as a warm summer morning where flowers were blossoming and the grass was green.

What is the author criticizing in The Lottery?

Finally, the author of the story seems to criticize a society that oppresses the weak and depends on outdated practices to maintain discriminative social order. The lottery helps the powerful to continue to control the town in other words capitalism goes on to enable Mr.

Why is the ending of the lottery so shocking?

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

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How does the lottery relate to real life?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

What is the moral lesson of the story The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

Why was Tessie killed in The Lottery?

Tessie is stoned to death because she’s the “winner” of the lottery. The townspeople seem to believe that unless they sacrifice one of their own, crops will fail. It’s an old tradition, and very few think to question it at all.