Is there a metaphor in the lottery?

A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words “like” or “as.” The shabby and splintered box that holds the lottery tickets is a metaphor for the increasingly worn and outdated lottery ritual. … The refusal to repair the box can be likened to the denial the village residents seem to be in about the lottery.

What is the metaphor in The Lottery?

The condition of the box—worn-out, faded, stained, and splintered—is a metaphor for the lottery itself, a ritual that has long outlived its usefulness and become worn and obsolete. Although Mr. Summers talks about making a new box, nobody in the village wants to do so.

What figurative language is in The Lottery?

With hyperbole meaning an exaggeration that is used for emphasis or effect, the entire story “The Lottery” can be considered a hyperbole.

What is the simile in The Lottery?

The phrases “fly like a bird” and “as red as a rose” are both similes. As the other Educators have noted, there is only one simile in “The Lottery,” which comes before the official lottery proceedings begin. Mrs. Hutchinson has been speaking to her friend and leaves her to go stand with her husband.

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What literary devices are used in The Lottery?

I hope you’ve found this “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson analysis useful. “The Lottery” uses a number of literary devices to create a story that is almost impossible to forget. It is filled with symbolism, irony and a clear understanding of how to tell a story as well as willingness to embrace controversy.

What does the three legged stool represent in The Lottery?

The three-legged stool represents the Christian Trinity. Each leg represents God the father, God the son, and the Holy Spirit. The three-legged stool holds the black box of death, which is ironic because the Christian Trinity represents purity and holiness, but the black box represents sin and evilness.

What is the point of view in The Lottery?

Third Person (Objective)

The narrator of “The Lottery” is super detached from the story. Rather than telling us the characters’ thoughts or feelings, the narrator simply shows the process of the lottery unfurling.

What is the imagery in The Lottery?

In the short story, “The Lottery”, Shirley Jackson uses imagery and symbolism to show that evil can be present in the most innocent environment, resulting in society being tainted with dark illusion. Superstitious tradition symbolized an important role to the people in this village.

What is the conflict in The Lottery?

Person versus society is the major conflict in “The Lottery” because the conflict revolves around Tessie Hutchinson’s struggle against her town, the citizens of which insist on observing a ritual of sacrifice each year in blind adherence to tradition.

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How is The Lottery an allegory?

Shirley Jackson’s story “The Lottery” serves as an allegory regarding humankinds inherent to be cruel and society’s ability to inure to violence. The author’s use of a third-person dramatic narrative combined with strong themes, symbols and irony clearly supports the lesson Jackson was trying to portray.